Susan's #ConfusingComms

Susan shares with us her example of #ConfusingComms and how she felt receiving an NHS letter that frustrated her.
Lady smiling. Image from Centre for Ageing Better

Susan shared with us via our #ConfusingComms campaign that she was sent a letter from the NHS to register to receive digital communications. The letter had no website URL, only a QR code. 

A QR code on the ‘switch to digital’ attachment to the letter was not very helpful. I managed to get a neighbour to use her smart phone to enter in all my details.

Why, why, why not give an internet address to do this? Not everyone has a smart phone. I did want to register for digital communications and felt angry that email/website facilities were not given.

Why, why, why not give an internet address to do this? Not everyone has a smart phone.

Susan's fustration could easily have been avoided if the letter had contained a URL address, rather than relying on patients being able to use QR codes. We have used Susan's feedback to highlight to local NHS services how they can improve their communications going out to patients.

Have you had a similar experience to Susan? 

You don't have to share your physical letter, email or text if you don't want to, we just want to know how it made you feel to read. What could have been improved? Was there any information missing? 

Share your #ConfusingComms experience

Want your NHS communications to be easy to understand? Tell us about your #ConfusingComms

We are asking local people to send examples of their poorly written NHS communications (letters, emails, texts). With your support, we will help the NHS learn how to improve their communications so that patients feel more confident to attend their appointments.

Share your #ConfusingComms